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Research & Write-In Session in the Library

Fenwick Library

Time flies! Is your paper done? Gateway Library@Johnson Center, Mason’s Writing Center, and Mason’s Office of Scholarship, Creative Activities, and Research (OSCAR) are sponsoring two Undergraduate Research & Write-In sessions on April 24

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art

smithsonian

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art October 25, 2013 – March 2, 2014 From the Smithsonian American Art Museum website: Carlos Almaraz, Night Magic (Blue Jester), 1988, Smithsonian American Art

Hispanic Portraits from the Catalog of American Portraits from the National Portrait Gallery

frida and diego rivera

Hispanic Portraits from the Catalog of American Portraits from the National Portrait Gallery Highlights of Hispanic portraits has been supported by Federal funds for Latino programming, administered by the Smithsonian Center

Curious about the New Image?

cropped-Mural_panoramico1.jpg

Curious about the new image at the top of this research portal? Presencia de América Latina (Presence of Latin America), also known as Integración de América Latina (Integration of Latin America) is a mural painted

Internships at Dumbarton Oaks

dumbartonoaks

The Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) support scholarship in Byzantine Studies by preserving and providing access to images of art, architecture, and archaeology in a variety of media and archival

Research & Write-In Session in the Library

Fenwick Library
rwispring2014.180

Time flies! Is your paper done? Gateway Library@Johnson Center, Mason’s Writing Center, and Mason’s Office of Scholarship, Creative Activities, and Research (OSCAR) are sponsoring two Undergraduate Research & Write-In sessions on April 24 and May 2. Gateway Library and Mason Writing Center staff will be available during each Research Write-In to assist undergrads with their specific research and writing needs in a structured environment. Gateway Library Instruction Room (Room 228) is the venue - a space for quiet work, free from distractions! Students should bring their own laptops; library laptops will be available, too. Registration is required. Space is limited to 25 students per session. Free meal provided for you!

April 24: 3 – 8 pm  Yes, I’m registering!  Registration Deadline: April 20
May 2: Noon – 5 pm  Yes, I’m registering!  Registration Deadline: April 29

For more information, contact Royce Gildersleeve, rgilders@gmu.edu, 703-993-9867.

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art

smithsonian

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art

October 25, 2013 – March 2, 2014

From the Smithsonian American Art Museum website:

Image for Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art

Carlos Almaraz, Night Magic (Blue Jester), 1988, 
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 
Gift of Gloria Werner © 1988, Carlos Almaraz Estate

 

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Artpresents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture.

The exhibition presents works in all media by 72 leading modern and contemporary artists. Of the 92 artworks featured in the exhibition, 63 have been acquired by the museum since 2011, representing its deep and continuing commitment to collecting Latino art. Our America includes works by artists who participated in all the various artistic styles and movements, including abstract expressionism; activist, conceptual, and performance art; and classic American genres such as landscape, portraiture, and scenes of everyday life. Latino artists across the United States were galvanized by the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s. They created new images of their communities and examined bicultural experiences. Many critically probed American history and popular culture, revealing the possibilities and tensions of expansionism, migration, and settlement. Other Latino artists in the exhibition devoted themselves to experimentation, pushing the limits of their chosen medium. “Our America” presents a picture of an evolving national culture that challenges expectations of what is meant by “American” and “Latino.”

Artists featured in the exhibition reflect the rich diversity of Latino communities in the United States. Our America showcases artists of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican descent, as well as other Latin American groups with deep roots in the United States. By presenting works by artists of different generations and regions, the exhibition reveals recurring themes among artists working across the country.

The 72 artists featured in the exhibition are ADÁL, Manuel Acevedo, Elia Alba, Olga Albizu, Carlos Almaraz, Jesse Amado, Asco (Harry Gamboa Jr., Gronk, Willie Herrón and Patssi Valdez), Luis Cruz Azaceta, Myrna Báez, Guillermo Bejarano, Charles “Chaz” Bojórquez, María Brito, Margarita Cabrera, María Magdalena Campos-Pons, Melesio “Mel” Casas, Leonard Castellanos, Oscar R. Castillo, José Cervantes, Enrique Chagoya, Roberto Chavez, Carlos A. Cortéz, Marcos Dimas, Ricardo Favela, Christina Fernandez, Teresita Fernández, iliana emilia garcía, Rupert García, Scherezade García, Carmen Lomas Garza, Ignacio Gomez, Ken Gonzales-Day, Hector González, Luis C. “Louie the Foot” González, Muriel Hasbun, Ester Hernandez, Judithe Hernández, Carmen Herrera, Carlos Irizarry, Luis Jiménez, Miguel Luciano, Emanuel Martinez, María Martínez-Cañas, Antonio Martorell, Ana Mendieta, Amalia Mesa-Bains, Franco Mondini-Ruiz, Delilah Montoya, Malaquias Montoya, Abelardo Morell, Jesús Moroles, Raphael Montañez Ortiz, Pepón Osorio, Amado M. Peña Jr., Chuck Ramirez, Paul Henry Ramirez, Sophie Rivera, Arturo Rodríguez, Freddy Rodríguez, Joseph Rodríguez, Frank Romero, Emilio Sánchez, Juan Sánchez, Jorge Soto Sánchez, Rafael Soriano, Ruben Trejo, Jesse Treviño, John M. Valadez, Alberto Valdés, and Xavier Viramontes.

The exhibition is organized by E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Connecting Online

The museum created a bilingual mobile website that includes commentaries about artworks in the exhibition and images of all the featured artworks. An audio podcast series features commentaries by curators and artists about artworks in the exhibition. Video shorts with the exhibition curator are available on YouTube. Photographs documenting the installation of the exhibition are on Flickr. The public also may follow the museum for exhibition updates on Twitter by following @americanart and using #ouramerica or by subscribing to the museum’s email list.

Hispanic Portraits from the Catalog of American Portraits from the National Portrait Gallery

frida and diego rivera

Hispanic Portraits from the Catalog of American Portraits from the National Portrait Gallery

Highlights of Hispanic portraits has been supported by Federal funds for Latino programming, administered by the Smithsonian Center for Latino Initiatives. Image reproduction requires the permission of the owners. (from http://npgportraits.si.edu/emuseumnpg/code/emuseum.asp?page=collections)

frida and diego record

Curious about the New Image?

cropped-Mural_panoramico1.jpg

Curious about the new image at the top of this research portal?

Presencia de América Latina (Presence of Latin America), also known as Integración de América Latina (Integration of Latin America) is a mural painted by Mexican artist Jorge González Camarena between November 1964 and April 1965. The 300-square-meter mural, painted in acrylicon rough stucco, is located in the lobby of the Casa del Arte of the University of Concepción (Ciudad Universitaria de Concepción), in ConcepciónChile. Its principal theme is the unity and brotherhood of the different Latin American cultures.

For more information about the artist Jorge González Camarena, check out his entry in The Getty’s Union List of Artist Names.

Internships at Dumbarton Oaks

dumbartonoaks

The Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) support scholarship in Byzantine Studies by preserving and providing access to images of art, architecture, and archaeology in a variety of media and archival collections that document fieldwork and research projects at Byzantine sites and monuments. ICFA is also the repository for the Pre-Columbian Photographs and Fieldwork Archives and Garden and Landscape Photographs and Design Archives.


Pre-Columbian Photograph and Fieldwork Archives Pre-Columbian Archives

GLS Thumbnail Garden & Landscape Archives

The Pre-Columbian Photograph and Fieldwork Archivesvisually document the cultural heritage of Mesoamerica, the Intermediate Area and the Andes over the last two millennia.

The Garden and Landscape Photograph and Design Archives comprise both historical and contemporary collections, including materials documenting the gardens of Dumbarton Oaks.

Scheduled maintenance on ARTstor

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Scheduled maintenance on ARTstor

Dear ARTstor User Support and Technical Contacts,Please be advised that ARTstor will be performing temporary scheduled maintenance on Saturday, September 15 between 10:00 PM and 2:00 AM EDT. Access to the ARTstor Digital Library will be temporarily suspended during this time, and institutions using Shared Shelf to manage their local image collections will be unable to use the system.
We do not anticipate any extension of this downtime, but we will send an update if there are any changes to the schedule.

Kind regards,

ARTstor User Services Team